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2017-12-11
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New Moon Day Separate from the 6 Work Days and the Seventh-Day Sabbath:

New Moon day is not counted as one of the 6 working days neither is it the seventh-day Sabbath; the new moon day starts the month as day 1 making the weekly Sabbaths to fall on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th of the lunar month. (See Ezekiel 46:1, Amos 8:5, 2 Kings 4:23, and Isaiah 66:23.)

Exodus 12:

Passover was on the 14th of the first month. The first day of the feast of unleavened bread was on the 15th which was a Sabbath (See Leviticus 23: 4-16). This makes the Sabbaths for the first month (Abib) to have fallen on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and the 29th. (Exodus 12.)

Exodus 16:

Manna fell for the six week days, but did not fall on the Sabbath which fell on the 22nd, making the other Sabbaths for that month fall on the 8th, 15th and 29th. (Exodus 16.)

Exodus 19

Israel left Egypt the night of Abib 15. Three months later, on the very same day, the 15th, they rested before the mount. (See Deuteronomy 16:1; Numbers 33:3; Exodus 19:1-2.), thus making the Sabbaths for the third month (as recorded in Exodus 19:1) fall on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th. The weekly Sabbaths for the first month (Exodus 12) and the second month (Exodus 16) fell on the same dates also; this is not possible on today's Gregorian Roman calendar which people use to identify their worship days.

Annual Feasts and High Sabbaths:

Every year, the feast of unleavened bread begins on the 15th, a Sabbath. The first day of feast of Tabernacles also falls on the 15th which is called a "holy convocation" and is followed, eight days later by another "holy convocation" on the 22nd, every single year. Two Sabbaths always falling on the 15th cannot occur on a solar calendar. (See Numbers 29:12-39; Leviticus 23:5, 6, 34, 35).

Entering Canaan:

The manna never fell on the seventh-day Sabbath. After entering Canaan, Israel kept Passover. The manna ceased on the 15th of Abib, the day after the Passover: Exodus 16; Joshua 5:10-12. This places the Sabbath for this month on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th.

Dedication of Priesthood:

Aaron and his sons were sanctified for seven days beginning on New Moon Day (See Exodus 40: 2, 17). On the eighth day (which was also the 8th of the month), there was an assembly of the congregation. During the preceding seven days, they were not to leave the tabernacle. (See Leviticus 8:1- 13; 33-35; 9:1-5). From Exodus 40: 17 we learn that it was the first month (Abib) of the second year after their departure from Egypt, in which Passover was to be kept; this is a double confirmation that the Sabbaths for this month fell on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th.

Solomon:

Solomon kept the Feast of Tabernacles for seven days. On the 8th day (22nd of the month) they made a solemn assembly. Solomon sent the people away on the 23rd, being careful not to send them away on the 22nd, the Sabbath. (See 2 Chronicles 7:8-10). This places the Sabbath for the seventh month on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th.

Esther 9:

The 15th of the 12th month was a rest day, making the 8th, 22nd and 29th rest days as well. (Esther 9.)

Hezekiah's Reform:

The people began to sanctify on New Moon day of the first month and on the 8th of the month they went to the temple. On the 16th of the month, they "made an end" which was the first day of the work week. (2 Chronicles 29:17.)

Crucifixion:

Passover was always on the 14th of Abib. (Leviticus 23:5.)

Christ's crucifixion occurred on Passover, on the sixth day of the week. Passover always occurred on the sixth day of the week, followed by the seventh-day Sabbath on the 15th. (See Mark 15:42; John 19:31; Lev. 23:6, 7, 11 and 15; John 19:42.)

Resurrection:

Christ was resurrected early in the morning on the first day of the week. (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1 and 2; Luke 24:1; John 20:1.)

Christ was resurrected on the 16th of Abib, the first day of the week, corresponding to the wave sheaf offering, or first fruits. (Leviticus 23:11.)

Paul called Christ the "first fruits of them that sleep" and stated that He was buried and rose the third day. (1 Corinthians 15:3, 4 and 20-23.)

On the walk to Emmaus, the two disciples told Christ that it was the third day since the crucifixion. (Luke 24:17-21.)

The crucifixion week establishes the weekly seventh-day Sabbath on Abib 15, thus making the 8th, 22nd and 29th days Sabbaths as well.

Healing of the Blind Man:

The last day of the Feast of Tabernacles always falls on the 21st day of the seventh month: (See Leviticus 23:34, 36, 39-41; Numbers 29:12; Deuteronomy 16:13-15; Nehemiah 8:13-18; Ezekiel 45:21-25.)

Christ attended the Feast of Tabernacles. (John7:10.)

On the last day of the Feast, the 21st of the seventh month, Christ stood and spoke. (John 7:37.)

Christ spent that night on the Mount of Olives. (John 8:1.)

The next morning, the 22nd of the seventh month, Christ returned to the temple. (John 8:2.)

At the temple, Christ healed a blind man. (John 9:6.)

The healing of the blind man caused great anger for it was the seventh-day Sabbath. (John 9:14.)

This places the weekly seventh-day Sabbaths on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th of the month yet again.

Paul's Journey:

The first day of the work week always fell on the 2nd of the month, the day after New Moon. In Luke's account of their journey, Paul's company sailed from Philippi after the feast of unleavened bread ended on the 21st of Abib, sailed for five days and arrived at Troas where they stayed seven days. (See Acts 20:5-7.)

The seventh day of their stay at Troas was the second day of the month which Paul refers to as the first day of the week. This again places the Sabbaths on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th days of the month. (For more on Paul's journey and how it corroborates the luni-solar calendar, click here.)

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Question: How does Acts 20:5-7 show that Luke used a Luni-Solar calendar to record the details of Apostle Paul's traveling?

Answer:

"These going before tarried for us at Troas.  And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days.  And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight." (Acts 20:5-7)

 

Paul's journey (Calendar)

Paul left "after the days of unleavened bread."  The feast of Unleavened Bread ends on the 21st day of the first lunar month.1  He made it to Troas in five days.  This places Paul's arrival in Troas on the 26th day2 of the month.  Five Days: (1) 22nd; (2) 23rd; (3) 24th; (4) 25th; (5) 26th (Bear in mind that the 22nd was a Sabbath so Paul would have traveled at night.)

After reaching Troas, Paul stayed for seven days and met with the disciples on the "first day of the week."  Seven Days: (1) 26th; (2) 27th; (3) 28th; (4) 29th; (5) 30th; (6) 1st [New Moon Day]; (7) 2nd [First Day of the Week]

The Biblical Luni-Solar Calendar is confirmed!


It is simply not possible to make this work with the modern Gregorian calendar and its continuous weekly cycle.  Let's try it below:

Paul's journey (Calendar)

Paul left "after the days of unleavened bread."  The feast of Unleavened Bread ends on the 21st day of the first lunar month.1  He made it to Troas in five days.  This places Paul's arrival in Troas on the 26th day2 of the month.  Five Days: (1) 22nd; (2) 23rd; (3) 24th; (4) 25th; (5) 26th

After reaching Troas, Paul stayed for seven days and met with the disciples on the "first day of the week."  Seven Days: (1) 26th; (2) 27th; (3) 28th; (4) 29th; (5) 30th; (6) 1st; (7) 2nd [Third Day of the Week]

Laying the papal Gregorian calendar over the Biblical narrative places Paul's meeting with the disciples on the third day of the week, not the first.  Even if we were to suppose that the first month here was a 29-day month, Paul's meeting with the disciples would have fallen on the second day of the week.  Again, it is simply not possible to make this work with the modern Gregorian calendar and its continuous weekly cycle.


Some have suggested that Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread are not fixed to specific days of the week.  They say that Passover, in this scenario, must have fallen on a Wednesday - because this is the only way that Paul could have met with the disciples on the "first day of the week" (without  abandoning the continuous weekly cycle paradigm).

Let us examine this proposed scenario:

Paul's journey (Calendar)  

Paul left "after the days of unleavened bread."  The feast of Unleavened Bread ends on the 21st day of the first lunar month.  He made it to Troas in five days.  This places Paul's arrival in Troas on the 26th day of the month.  Five Days: (1) 22nd; (2) 23rd; (3) 24th; (4) 25th; (5) 26th

After reaching Troas, Paul stayed for seven days and met with the disciples on the "first day of the week."  Seven Days: (1) 26th; (2) 27th; (3) 28th; (4) 29th; (5) 30th; (6) 1st; (7) 2nd [First Day of the Week

This scenario does place Paul's meeting with the disciples on the first day of the Gregorian planetary week.  There is, however, a very clear problem here: the 10th day of the month falls on the seventh day of the Gregorian week - Saturday (here supposed by Gregorian calendar advocates to be the Sabbath).  The 10th day of the first month cannot be a Sabbath, though, for this was the day that the children of Israel were to select their Passover lamb.  This was a work day, a commerce day (not a Sabbath), because those who did not own a lamb had to purchase one on this day.

"Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth day of this month [the first month] they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a lamb for an house . . . And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening."  (Exodus 12:3-6)

Again, the proposed scenario here does not fit.  Only the Luni-Solar Calendar, which restarts the weekly count with each New Moon, successfully harmonizes all of the details of Luke's narrative.


1 The Feast of Unleavened Bread is a seven day feast beginning on the 15th day of the first month (on the Sabbath, Passover being on the 6th day of the week).  "In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is Yahuwah's Passover.  And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto Yahuwah: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread." (Leviticus 23:5-6)

(1st Day = 15th; 2nd Day = 16th; 3rd Day = 17th; 4th Day = 18th; 5th Day = 19th; 6th Day = 20th; 7th Day = 21st)

2 It could be argued that Paul actually left the night of the 21st, placing him in Troas on the 25th.  This is a possibility, but does not disturb the Luni-Solar paradigm in the least.  A 29-day month would still place Paul's meeting with the disciples on the "first day of the week."  The modern Gregorian calendar, however, cannot be harmonized with the details of Paul's journey.

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